Sacramento Personal Injury Lawyer

Schedule Your FREE Consultation

(916) 778-3228

Can a falling TV cause a brain injury in a child? Some say yes

Can a falling TV cause a brain injury in a child? Some say yes

Think back to your childhood and the television set you had. If you're like many of our readers, it was probably clunky and rather heavy. If you bumped into it, it likely didn't move much. With advancements in technology though, this isn't the case anymore.

Large tube televisions have given way to sleek-and-slim LCD screens that weigh a fraction of their older counterparts. The cost of larger televisions has also gone down, allowing consumers to purchase bigger televisions. But while many see this trend as a good thing, it's also creating a potential problem that is only being exacerbated by another multi-media change: shorter television stands.

If you've ever wandered through the vast warehouse that is IKEA, you've probably noticed the shift in the last few decades toward shorter television stands. As one author for CNET explains, television height is important both for viewer comfort and to improve view of the television. But as some of our Sacramento readers may realize, lower stands make access to television sets easier for small children. If a television is not secured to the stand or the wall, a youngster may easily pull it over, perhaps even onto him or herself.

According to a study that was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery, toddlers are most at risk of injury when a television falls on them. Though televisions may be slimmer and seem to weigh less, flat screen televisions can still cause serious injury depending on where it strikes the child or if it breaks when it falls. In some cases, a flat screen television may even cause a toddler to suffer a traumatic brain injury.

Some experts say child supervision is key to preventing many of these accidents from occurring. On top of that, parents should also consider properly fixing their television to a wall or the stand to help mitigate an accident even further.

Source: UPI, "Toppling TVs cause head, neck injuries in children," Stephen Feller, Sept. 29, 2015

Categories